MARTA for Gwinnett
MARTA for Gwinnett
Bringing regional transit to Gwinnett County

Types of Service


Below is a list of transit technologies planned for use in the Connect Gwinnett Plan. Each one of these are already in use, or are planned to be soon, within the metro Atlanta Area. Knowing what each one is will help you understand just what the plan, and what MARTA, has to offer to Gwinnett County. For more general information on transit modes, including those not currently planned for Gwinnett, refer to:

ALL CONNECT GWINNETT TRANSIT MODE DEFINITIONS


 Picture Credit: MARTA

Picture Credit: MARTA

Heavy Rail Transit (HRT)

Heavy rail transit (HRT) is an electric railway characterized by high speed and rapid acceleration passenger rail cars typically operating in multi-car trains on fixed rails, separated right-of-way from which all other vehicular and foot traffic are excluded, sophisticated signaling, and high platform level entry loading. Substantial and sophisticated passenger amenities are typically provided in HRT systems.

Station Spacing: Core ~ ½ mile; Periphery ~ 1 to 5 miles

Runningway Type: Exclusive dedicated

Example Systems: MARTA, Chicago “L”, New York City Subway, BART, D.C. Metrorail


 Picture Credit: Wikipedia

Picture Credit: Wikipedia

Commuter / Express Bus Service

Express bus service is typically designed to serve specific long-distance travel markets and specific employment centers to reduce travel time and increase convenience and attractiveness for its patrons. Services typically have stops only at termini and operate with limited frequency during off-peak periods.

Station/Stop Spacing: Limited stops, primarily at route termini

Runningway Type: Mostly mixed flow, may benefit from HOV or other managed lanes

Example Systems: GRTA, REX in Fairfax County and Alexandria


 Picture Credit: Roger DuPuis on Flickr

Picture Credit: Roger DuPuis on Flickr

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Bus rapid transit (BRT) system elements are similar to those more commonly found in rail transit systems, though generally at lower capacity. BRT typically employs specifically branded special vehicles, sophisticated transit stations, off-board fare collection, level boarding, transit priority at intersections, and fully to mostly dedicated transit runningways.

Station Spacing: ¼ mile or more

Runningway Type: Primarily dedicated

Example Systems: Cleveland, Eugene, Los Angeles, Boston, Kansas City


 Picture Credit: MARTA

Picture Credit: MARTA

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) / Rapid Bus

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) systems share some elements with BRT systems, however, the level of accommodation for transit vehicles and passengers is typically less than with BRT. ART typically operates in a mixture of dedicated (including HOV and managed lanes) and general purpose travel lanes. Rapid bus may benefit from transit signal priority, queue jump lanes, dedicated/specifically designed stops, and enhanced passenger amenities such as level boarding, off-board fare collection, and covered/ enclosed waiting areas.

Station Spacing: ¼ mile to 2 miles

Runningway Type: Mixed flow and dedicated lane

Example Systems: Bay area, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles


 Picture Credit: MARTA

Picture Credit: MARTA

Frequent Bus Service

Frequent Bus Service is a transit mode comprised of rubber-tired passenger vehicles operating on fixed routes and schedules over roadways, and in mixed traffic.

Somewhat flexible stops marked by pole and panel. High-use stops are upgraded to shelters. Uses on board fare payment, and is characterized by its short headway.

Station Spacing: 1-2 blocks to ¼ mile

Runningway Type: Mixed flow

Example Systems: MARTA


 Picture Credit:MARTA

Picture Credit:MARTA

Local Bus Service

Local buses are a transit mode comprised of rubber-tired passenger vehicles operating on fixed routes and schedules over roadways.

Local buses have somewhat flexible stops, usually marked by pole and panel. High-use stops are upgraded to shelters, and fare payment occurs on board.

Station Spacing: 1-2 blocks to ¼ mile

Runningway Type: Mixed flow

Example Systems: MARTA, GCT


 Picture Credit: MARTA

Picture Credit: MARTA

Flex Service

Demand-responsive local bus or shuttle service that operates in a defined geographic area. Includes services that may not have fixed stop locations, a fixed route or a fixed schedule (or any of those elements). Service may be requested through advanced reservations (online, app-based, or phone) or in some cases, on-demand. Generally implemented in lower demand and lower density areas to provide connectivity to a transfer point or a larger transit network. Vehicle type varies based on demand.

Station/Stop Spacing: 1-3 blocks to 1 / 8 mile or door-to-door

Runningway Type: Mixed flow

Example Systems: MARTA, Denver, Alameda County (CA), Cape Cod